Community Demographics and the Propensity to Report Animal Cruelty

Escrito por Nuria Querol i Viñas.

The last decade has seen an increased awareness concerning links between violence to nonhuman animals and violence to humans.
Abstract
2006, Vol. 9, No. 3, Pages 201-210
(doi:10.1207/s15327604jaws0903_2)

Community Demographics and the Propensity to Report Animal Cruelty

Nicola Taylor
School of Psychology and Sociology, Central Queensland University
Tania D. Signal
School of Psychology and Sociology, Central Queensland University



The last decade has seen an increased awareness concerning links between violence to nonhuman animals and violence to humans. This has resulted in a number of cross-reporting initiatives between family service providers and animal welfare organizations. The success of these initiatives rests on individuals being willing to report such violence. Thus, there is a need to determine which variables influence an individual's willingness to report deliberate animal cruelty and abuse. The aim of this study was to examine demographic and attitudinal variables to ascertain their impact on propensity to report deliberate animal harm. A telephone questionnaire resulted in 1,208 valid responses from members of the general community. Results showed a number of variables that affected the propensity to report: gender, occupation, and acknowledgment of the link between family violence and deliberate animal harm. This article discusses these variables and their implications.