Impact of Domestic Violence on Women and Pets Australia)

Escrito por Australian Veterinary Journal.

Impact of Domestic Violence on Women and Pets
Australian women experiencing intimate partner violence reported a high rate of pets, usually dogs belonging to them rather than to their partner, being verbally and/or physically abused by their partner. In 84% of households with multiple pets, one animal was singled out as a target animal for abuse. 27% of respondents reported animals dying, largely as a result of abuse. 85% of women reported their animals experienced behavioral changes, such as fear of men and anxiety. Many were unaware of accommodation services for people fleeing violence; those who did know were unwilling to use these services, citing their bond with the animals. 92% indicated they were unwilling to discuss the animal abuse with a veterinarian, either because they did not feel able to speak to the veterinarian about the abuse, fear of repercussions from their partner, they believed the veterinarian would be judgmental about them, or they felt ashamed of the abuse.
‐‐ Tiplady, C.M., Walsh, D.B., & Phillips, C.J.C. (2012). Intimate partner violence and companion animal welfare. Australian Veterinary Journal, 90(1‐2), 48‐53.

Australian women experiencing intimate partner violence reported a high rate of pets, usually dogsbelonging to them rather than to their partner, being verbally and/or physically abused by their partner.



In 84% of households with multiple pets, one animal was singled out as a target animal for abuse. 27% of respondents reported animals dying, largely as a result of abuse. 85% of women reported their animals experienced behavioral changes, such as fear of men and anxiety. Many were unaware of accommodation services for people fleeing violence; those who did know were unwilling to use these services, citing their bond with the animals. 92% indicated they were unwilling to discuss the animal abuse with a veterinarian, either because they did not feel able to speak to the veterinarian about the abuse, fear of repercussions from their partner, they believed the veterinarian would be judgmental about them, or they felt ashamed of the abuse.‐‐

Tiplady, C.M., Walsh, D.B., & Phillips, C.J.C. (2012). Intimate partner violence and companion animal welfare. Australian Veterinary Journal, 90(1‐2), 48‐53.